General discussions on Technical Illustration
astan
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Oct 16, 2015 12:00 pm

Is This Created By Pencil?

by astan Tue Feb 02, 2016 2:34 pm

I take a look on below automotive illustration of Mr. David Kimble. It looks like it was made by using vector image software for the line art and a photoshop for the airbrush color rendering. However, Mr. Kimble says it was made by using traditional method (pencil and spray airbrush for color rendering). Which one do you think is true?
If using pencil, how the result is so neat, how can the airbrush is not smeared?
Anyone know the actual size of this illustration in centimeters?

Image
User avatar
Don Cheke
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Fri Oct 08, 2010 3:01 pm
Location: Saskatoon, SK Canada

Re: Is This Created By Pencil?

by Don Cheke Wed Feb 03, 2016 2:12 am

See the preview of this book. Lots of pages to read: https://books.google.ca/books?id=t5YfCg ... le&f=false
User avatar
JamesProvost
 
Posts: 167
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 8:03 pm
Location: Toronto, Canada

Re: Is This Created By Pencil?

by JamesProvost Tue Feb 16, 2016 2:29 pm

That illustration doesn't appear in Kimble's book Cutaways but he does explain his process in some detail.

Most of his renderings are 20 to 30 inches wide. They start as pencil drawings, often on multiple pieces of paper to separate the layers (vehicle exterior, chassis, engine, interior, etc).

Next, the drawings are combined and inked onto transparent film, much like a classical animation cell. Since 2005, Kimble has had his assistant Rick Terrell "ink" them digitally and then print them directly to the film.

Kimble then paints the back side of the film with Winsor & Newton designers' gouache loaded into an airbrush. He starts with the darkest colours and shading, then works towards the base colour for each part. He uses adhesive vinyl masking film called frisket, cut by hand, to mask off areas to be painted. Highlights and corrections are painted on the front side of the film, overtop of the printed line art.

The book is a great resource. It's as much a history of the American automotive industry as it is about his art and career.
Return to General

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests