Jim Hatch

Being into motorcycles and cars I’ve been a big fan of Jim Hatch for quite a few years.
He’s been a big inspiration for me and I’ve often sought his advice regarding my own illustration career.

Jim was kind enough to take the time to answer some of my questions and I’m thrilled to learn more about this extremely talented illustrator.

How long have you been an illustrator?
– I was first paid for my work in 1991 while still in college, so 18 years now.

Are you a freelancer, do you have your own business or do you work for a company?
– I built my own studio at my home in Santa Barbara, CA

Jim Hatch - Wind Turbine

Jim Hatch - Wind Turbine

Software of choice?
– I am on a Mac using Photoshop and Illustrator on a 30″ Apple monitor and use a Wacom tablet.

Favorite clients jobs?
– My favorite job is the one I’m working on at the present time.
Jim Hatch - Helmet

Jim Hatch - Helmet

What’s your background, how did you get started?
– I went to Otis/Parsons School of Design in Los Angeles from 1987 to 1991 and majored in Illustration so that was the formal start I guess.  My senior year I met with my mentor Kevin Hulsey who offered me a job while still in school and that launched my professional career as well as being an incredible learning experience.  From there I became the Exhibit Designer and Art Director for the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles where I got to create many Illustrations, posters and did tons of graphic & exhibit design.   I left the museum and went freelance and have been on my own ever since.


Jim Hatch - Dunlop

Jim Hatch - Dunlop

Any advice for illustrators just starting out?
– I feel like I am still starting out compared to the people I admire like Kevin Hulsey, David Kimble and Tony Matthews.  I think everyone’s experience is unique but hard work, tons of practice and a true passion for Illustration should translate into results over time.   For me the traditional drawing skills & theory I learned early in my career using ellipse templates, proper perspective and subtle line weight techniques have proved invaluable and form the basis for everything I do.  I see many people coming up that don’t understand what they are drawing and just draw shapes and hope it works out.

Check out the rest of his work on his site, Jim Hatch Illustration

Welcome!

Hello, welcome to TI.org. After a ton of searching for a website or forums dedicated to Technical Illustration I realized, to the best of my knowledge, that there was a serious lack of content out there. At most you usually find a post or 2 about how to draw in isometric or a random interview with Kevin Hulsey. I mean we don’t even have our own magazine! I know we are a pretty small, niche group but there are enough of us out there to justify creating a new site where we can all exchange ideas, tips, network with each other and hopefully get and give inspiration along the way.

I got a hold of James about my idea for a site and he just happened to be thinking the same thing and he moved ahead full steam to get this site going, so thanks James. We also welcome contributions from anyone, so if you have an idea or suggestion for the site, leave it in the comments or send an email to suggest@technicalillustrators.org.

Please keep checking back in as we will be updating it often.
Thanks and I hope you will enjoy the site.

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“Technical illustrators create highly accurate renderings of machinery, instruments, scientific subjects… technology, cartography, or virtually any subject that requires precision interpretation…to achieve the most explicit and accurate visualization of the subject or information.”

—Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing & Ethical Guidelines, 11th Edition. pp. 196-197.

TechnicalIllustrators.org is a blog & community for technical illustrators, by technical illustrators, to share references, resources, techniques, tips, tricks and to showcase portfolios.

If you’d like to contribute an article, resource, link, or anything else, see Suggest a Link or email it to suggest@technicalillustrators.org.